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Digital Marketing during Lockdown

Is it right to do digital marketing during lockdown to promote yourself and your business? Yes. If you do it sensitively and with empathy. What channels should you use? What approaches to digital marketing should you take?

The lockdown is a massive challenge for everyone

The lockdown is a massive challenge for everyone, especially freelancers, the self-employed, and SMEs/SMBs who might have had to furlough staff (not to mention those with children at home and teenagers back early from university). Some people will have had to change the way they work and adapt to working from home. I’ve been working from home for the last 5+ years, so that’s less of an issue. However, we’ve all had to adopt a new routine to a greater or lesser extent.

My heart goes out to you if you’ve lost business due to the lockdown, or had to close altogether. You have my sympathy and empathy. For those of you that are carrying on regardless – business as usual, albeit working from home – then more power to you.

Some businesses will have been siginificantly busier because of the lockdown

It’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good, as the saying goes. Some businesses will have been siginificantly busier because of the lockdown. I’m thinking of bike shops here, as people like me who haven’t ridden a bike for years decide to get some fresh air and exercise during our one hour’s allowed outdoor exercise time. Home gym and fitness equipment will have seen a massive upswing. IT and tech too in the first weeks of the enforced lockdown. Employees worked from home for the first time and rushed to buy laptops, monitors, external keyboards collaborative software and VPNs. Lots of people bought comfortable, more relaxed WFH clothing too. Suits and smart casual attire has been swapped for loungewear and athleisure hoodies and jogging bottoms.

How you can use marketing to your advantage, sensitively

I’d like to share some advice and tips with you for how you can use digital marketing during lockdown to your advantage. Sensitively, and with empathy. Together we can emerge stronger when some semblance of normality is restored. Or, whatever the new “normal” is, anyway.

Digital Marketing during a pandemic

As my friends and colleagues at the digital marketing agency Limelight have said, many businesses are faced with a stark choice at the moment:

During these crazy times we have noticed one of two dynamics…

  1. Stop everything, cut marketing budgets as not sure when this will end.

  2. We need to be prepared for when this does end so we’re in the strongest position both online and offline.

If you’ve had to stop altogether then, again, you have my sympathy. I hope to see you and work with you again in the near future.

However, if you’re carrying on with “business as usual”, or trying to establish yourself in a new marketplace or with a different business model, then you will still need marketing activities.

Don’t take your foot off the accelerator

Limelight go on to say:

Just now, many of your competitors are reducing their marketing budgets and have put any marketing plans on hold, which means you may be able to get ahead! Think of it like the hare taking a break while in the lead only to let the tortoise win the race with dedicated effort. Don’t take your foot off the accelerator unless you have to.

Of course, a lot of businesses are simply not able to invest due to lost revenue and if that’s the case then simply skip this tip. However, for everyone else, this is extremely important. If you are in a position to do so, now is the time to gain a competitive advantage in the months and years to come. You need to be thinking ahead rather than focusing on the now.

You can read more tips on the Limelight website.

Is it ethical to market yourself and your business right now?

Some people have even questioned the ethics of marketing your business during a pandemic, asking if it’s at all appropriate to focus on marketing during the current situation. Leaving the morals and ethics aside, what can you do to keep your business going and ensure that you’re ready to hit the ground running when lockdown is lifted?

Digital Marketing channels

You can use a number of different channels and techniques to market your business. Online is especially important and effective now. More so than ever. SEO, social media and Google search (organic search rankings, Google Ads PPC, Google MyBusiness and Local Search) are your main digital marketing tools.

What approach should I take?

Whatever channel you use, there’s agreement that you should approach communications and digital marketing during lockdown sensitively. You can do this in a number of ways. These are:

  • Show empathy – we’re all in this together. Showing the human side of your business is a good idea. Be kind. Always.
  • Solve problems or provide a service – offer advice and solutions to problems rather than concentrate on the “hard sell”.
  • Offer businesses a lifeline – go above and beyond. Service your existing clients. Make them feel valued and show appreciation that they’ve stuck with you. Perhaps even offer your services at a discount or for free if you can afford to do so.
  • Spread the love – show appreciation for other businesses and individuals who are doing great work. This especially applies to sole traders, freelancers and the self-employed, and SMEs/SMBs who may benefit most from a shout out and a positive review. Give something back. Pay things forwards.
  • Brand awareness – one day this will all be over. Make sure that you’re in the forefront of people’s minds when things get back to something like normal. Again, ditch the hard sell though.
  • Reinforce expertise and thought leadership – use LinkedIn and the other social media channels to communicate with people. Like, Comment and Share other people’s Posts and Tweets. Post relevant industry and sector news. Share good news stories. See “Spread the love”. Social media is the ideal place to do this. If you haven’t got the time to do it yourself then get a freelancer to do it for you.
  • Network – face-to-face networking in real life isn’t possible at the moment, of course. However, many networking groups are taking to Zoom for virtual meetings. Keep in touch with your existing networking contacts, and check in with them. You might even make some new ones. I’ve had my first ever Zoom networking group meeting this week. I made new connections and even gained new business. It works, even if you’re not sure that it’s for you.

Those are just some ways you can market yourself and your business without being crass or overly commercial. I hope that it helps you and your business take advantage of digital marketing during lockdown. Stay safe, stay well and stay home. See you on the other side.

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Being social at a distance

Being social from a distance
Being social from a distance

Social situations have always been problematic for me (see previous blog post – Social Anxiety & The Networking Event), not least in a business context, so it was with some trepidation that I set out for my marketing referral event on Wednesday the 14th. As things turned out, everything went well on the day and I even learnt something very interesting – that I was by no means the only one in the room who was nervous about these sort of business events.

A fellow attendee said that it was a massive effort for her to come to them too, even though the particular event is fortnightly and she’s been to loads of them. She went on to say that it’s even harder to find the motivation to attend for someone who’s a reluctant networker AND self-employed as there isn’t a Manager or boss to compel you to go! I was surprised to hear this coming from someone who outwardly seemed very confident in that environment, but also heartened by the fact that I was by no means alone in my unease about having to actually talk to people.

Aspergers & social anxiety

As an Aspergers (Aspie) male, I often find social situations very difficult. I’m not alone in this. Fellow Aspie and Staffordshire resident Paddy Considine used to stay in bed rather than face the day, and hide under the table when there was a knock on the door. Speaking to people was all too much.

There are many unwritten social rules that people without an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) seem to learn and put into practice instinctively. As these rules are unwritten, people with an ASD often have to work hard at learning them, and they can be confusing. Add in an Aspie’s fear of being anything less than perfect, worries about being judged negatively by others, and the feeling of dread about having to step outside our comfort zone into the mix too, all making the perceived lack of social skills and the inability to “fit in” and “mingle” a cause of much anxiety. Sometimes it’s an achievement to even get out of the door! Even if an Aspie appears to be doing well in a social situation, it could be that it’s taking so much effort on their part that they are eventually and inevitably going to crash. Hopefully this will be behind closed doors once they’re home and are able to “decompress”, but sometimes spectacular ‘meltdowns’ happen in public.

Networking for people who hate networking – business situations & social anxiety

Meltdowns are bad for all concerned at the best of times, but especially so when it happens in front of your work colleagues or potential clients.

I’ve shown my face at work functions only to flit ghost-like around the room, not say a word to anybody or be noticed by anyone, make for the door and then beat a hasty retreat to the sanctuary of my hotel room. The fact that I wasn’t missed as all of the extrovert Neurologically Typical (NTs) “had fun” spoke volumes.

I mentioned ‘Networking for People Who Hate Networking’ by Devora Zack (Berrett-Koehler, 2010) in my previous blog post, Social Anxiety & The Networking Event, and that book could just as well have been called ‘Networking for Aspies’. In fact, there are many other books on Aspies and business, as a quick Google search on the topic shows. We’re a niche and captive market. Such business luminaries as Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are (suspected to be) Aspie too.

Why is it that Aspies fear social situations yet often excel at social media? Being social at a distance

All this leads me to ponder the key question at the heart of this blog post – why is it that Aspies fear and loathe social situations so much yet often excel at and revel in social media? In other words, being social at a distance.

Sherri Schultz, AKA Pensive Aspie, says in her blog post on Aspies and Social Media:

Online communities allow Aspies to make friends – real friends – for maybe the first time in their lives without the stress of being socially correct.  Being online removes the stress of eye contact, correct posture, correct tone and appearance.  You can sit in your favourite ratty pyjamas and make a friend without ever having to brush your hair or put on shoes… No painful conversations trying to find some mutual connection. No internal dialogue about remembering eye contact or not standing with your arms [folded]. There is safety behind the screen.

This also applies to the business sphere. In other words, you can just be you without having to concentrate on being you (or the more business-y version of you), whilst working from home wearing an old, comfy sweatshirt and joggers or remain safely ensconced in your bullpen cubicle in the far back corner of your open plan office floor.

In real life social situations, the back and forth of conversation doesn’t give you much time to process what someone has said to you and formulate an answer. If I pause during conversation to think about what I’m going to say next someone else often jumps in and fills the gap. It’s not an awkward silence, and I’m not lost for words, I’m thinking what I’m going to say next! I find it really irritating when I’m not allowed to finish what I’m trying to say, and I often come away from those sort of one-sided conversations feeling angry and frustrated.

You don’t have to react and reply instantaneously with social media. You have time to read someone’s Tweet or Facebook post, absorb and process it, then come up with a well-honed reply. We’re usually good with the written word you see, and we can delete and re-write our Tweets or posts before we hit the Enter button. You can’t rewind and re-phrase an actual verbal conversation.

Is social media killing the art of conversation?

However, some people think that Social Media is actually killing the art of conversation.

bunnies rabbiting
Social Media is killing the art of conversation

If you use Twitter or Facebook or Instagram, everybody already knows everything there is to know about you. That sailing trip you took? Liked. Breaking up with your girlfriend? Replied to on Twitter. All these over-sharing, always-on social networks create situations where there’s nothing left to talk about! [Shoebox Blog via Neatorama]

So, what’s the answer? Perhaps there’s a third way. If you know it, feel free to Tweet it to me; or, alternatively, arrange a 1-2-1 and we’ll have an actual real life, face-to-face chat. If I can make it out of the front door, that is.

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Blog Guest Blog

7 Steps to building a brilliant brand

branding
Branding

In the first of what I hope will be a regular series of posts from different Guest Bloggers, please welcome Charlotte from F&R Designs. Charlotte lives in North Dorset, and is studying for BA (Hons) in Graphic Design as well as running her design business. Connect with her on her WebsiteFacebook page or Tweet her! Here are her 7 steps for building a brilliant brand.

Step One

Tag Line – A memorable, meaningful and concise statement that captures the essence of your brand. I believe this is a good place to start. You can brainstorm from here, and you already have your company name but you will need something that will run alongside your logo. A world famous brand like Coca-Cola has had a few over the years, but probably the most well known one is ‘The Original’ (Coke think that there are lots of imitation colas). Ask yourself – how do you want prospective clients to remember you?

Step Two

Colour pallet – When thinking about colour you may have a definite pallet in mind but really you need to research it as different colours mean different things to different people and in different cultures. Have a read through colour theory as we tend to associate colours with feelings. Color Matters has some great information on this. Once you have chosen your colour scheme you can apply it to a logo when you have one, which leads nicely on to step three.

Step Three

Logo – You’ve got your company name, but do you have any ideas for an appropriate and clever logo? Work with a designer as this could be the make or break of how you are seen and remembered. There are lots of graphics applications online that you can use to build a logo, but I think this is one area where you can’t afford to cut corners! I wrote a detailed blog post on logos – check it out.

Step four

Voice – Is your brand friendly? Be conversational. Is it ritzy? Be more formal. How do you want your customers to ‘hear’ you? This needs to be taken into account when presenting yourself, be it in person or online. Pictures also need to be taken into consideration as well, just remember to use the same tone throughout. Consistency is key.

Step five

Social media – You know your own product best, but who will it attract? Who’s your audience? Where do they hang out? If you can’t answer these questions, you could speak to Giles regarding social media marketing and advertising. He will identify your social media “tribe” on all of the different social media channels and promote your services or products to them. It’s not all sell, sell, sell though. It is vitally important to have conversations with people – it is called social media after all. Remember the 4-1-1 rule for Twitter – “For every one self-serving tweet, you should re-tweet one relevant tweet and most importantly share four pieces of relevant content written by others.”

Step six

Integrity – Now you’ve got everything in place and your product is out there, you need to be true to what you’ve promised in your tag line. Integrity is how all the great brands became great! It’s a truism that word of mouth is the best form of advertising, and it’s a real compliment when I’m recommended by someone else. These people are not just satisfied clients, they’re Brand Ambassadors, and your biggest reputational assest. Testimonials from real people help build integrity and trust. Consider using online reviews for transparency and building trust, if it’s appropriate to your business.

Step seven

Don’t stress – Now this is a big one. Everyone talks about numbers and followers on social media like it’s the be-all and end-all, but raw numbers mean nothing. It’s really all about quality not quantity. Why have followers who are’nt your target audience, unless they actually enhance your business in some other way (a business guru who is a major influencer, for instance)? Chances are they won’t actually interact with you, and it’s far better to have less followers that do actually comment and react to your product or services for real, rather than have 1000s of followers who never mention you. Don’t be tempted to buy followers, ever. It harms your brand perception, destroys integrity, and exposes your business to some very dodgy people whom you really don’t want to give your credit card details to! Plus, don’t sweat the metrics. Your domain authority (DA) or your Klout score really isn’t all that important to your bottom line – just get the fundamentals right and enjoy it!

I hope that these 7 steps to building a brilliant brand have been a help when considering your brand initially, or with re-branding. Please visit me for your graphic design needs in the South West.

signiture

 

www.fandrdesigns.co.uk

@fresh_rosy

charlotte@fandrdesigns.co.uk